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“The Second Time Around” – Encores to end the season

By Liz Snyder The Kenosha Pops Concert Band is closing its 2016 summer season Aug. 3 by playing favorite tunes from this summer’s performances. This summer, however, the band’s traditional program of encores contains two More »

“The Second Time Around” – Encores to end the season

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By Liz Snyder
The Kenosha Pops Concert Band is closing its 2016 summer season Aug. 3 by playing favorite tunes from this summer’s performances. This summer, however, the band’s traditional program of encores contains two pieces — the medley “One Hit Wonders” and “Rainy Days and Mondays” — that were never performed. (Both songs are from the band’s rained out rock ’n’ roll program on June 22.) The medley includes “Hang On Sloopy,” “Whip It,” “Rock & Roll Part II (The Hey Song)” and “Mickey,” while “Rainy Days and Mondays” was made famous by The Carpenters. 

Craig Gall, the band’s musical director, said, “We had another great summer of music making for the Kenosha community. And we appreciate all their support. “It was fun to include a lot of new music this season, and our sports-themed concert last week was very well received. Our only problem was with the weather — with rain a few weeks and some very humid conditions.” Tonight’s program, he added, “features pieces from every concert we played — and the one we didn’t play.”

Assistant Conductor Garrett Kornman said, as he does every summer, “I can’t believe it’s the end of another Pops Band season. It seems to go by so fast every year. This is a great group of musicians, and I really appreciate everyone’s effort.”

The program also features:

From the band’s Broadway-themed concert on June 15:
– “Seventy Six Trombones” from the 1957 Broadway show “The Music Man” by Meredith Willson.

From the June 29 Western-themed concert:
– “Prairie Reflections,” a medley of three classic cowboy tunes — “Along the Navajo Trail,” “Nobody’s Darlin’ But Mine” and “Just Because.”
– Music from the Broadway musical “Paint Your Wagon.” This piece is new to the Pops Band this year, though it’s from 1951. “It took us several years to find a long out-of-print edition of this piece,” Gall said. The Lerner and Loewe musical contains the songs “Wand’rin Star,” “I Still See Elisa,” “I Talk to the Trees” and “They Call the Wind Maria.” Greg Berg, the band’s master of ceremonies, will sing that final tune.

From the July 4 patriotic favorites program:
– John Philip Sousa’s “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” the official national march of the United States of America.
– “America the Beautiful,” with Berg on vocals.

From the July 13 movie music concert:
– “Bond … James Bond,” featuring four of 007’s most famous theme songs — “Goldfinger,” “Nobody Does it Better,” “Skyfall” and “Live and Let Die.”
– The “Captain America March” from the superhero movie.
– The theme from the 1962 movie “Lawrence of Arabia.” The Oscar-winning score was composed by Maurice Jarre, who was given just six weeks to create two hours of orchestral music. Gall describes this driving piece as “a percussionist’s paradise.”

From the July 20 Far East concert:
– “Pachinko” by Paul Yoder. “The percussion heard in this piece emulates the sounds of those Japanese pinball machines,” Kornman said.
– “Yagi-Bushi,” a Japanese folk song arranged by Naohiro Iwai.

From the July 27 sports-themed concert:
– “The Olympic Spirit,” composed by John Williams for the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea.
– “I’m Shipping Up to Boston” as performed by the Dropkick Murphys. “This is a song played in stadiums to get the crowd pumped up,” Kornman said.
– The “Kammerfensterl Polka,” which was included on “sports night” because, as Gall notes, “Two to three hours of polka dancing is good aerobic exercise.”

The program will also feature “Old Scottish Melody” — better known as “Auld Lang Syne.” That traditional piece, sung by Berg, has become the band’s signature sign-off each season.

“It’s always sad to see the summer season end,” Gall said, adding, “but we’ll see everyone Dec. 17 at Carthage College for our Christmas concert.”

If you go
What: The Kenosha Pops Concert Band’s final concert of the 2016 season
When: 7:00 Aug. 3
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, at 35th Street and Seventh Avenue on Kenosha’s lakefront
Admission: Free

The Sporting Life

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by Liz Snyder
Grab that Packers jersey from the back of the closet or pull out your favorite Kenosha Kingfish T-shirt and cap before heading to the July 27 Kenosha Pops Concert Band performance on the band shell. The band’s theme is “The Sporting Life,” featuring songs with a sports connection. 

“This is a brand new theme we’re trying out,” said Craig Gall, the band’s conductor. “We encourage audience members to wear their favorite team apparel.”

Garrett Kornman, the band’s assistant conductor, said the sports theme “came about because we were looking for some new music and heard the NFL Films piece. And with the Olympics opening next week, it was perfect for this summer. People will recognize many of these pieces.”

Olympics-related pieces include:
– John Williams’ themes from two different Olympics games — “The Olympic Spirit” from the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, and “Olympic Fanfare and theme” from the 1984 Los Angeles Games.
– “Olympische Hymne,” composed by Richard Strauss for the 1936 Berlin Games.
– “Nadia’s Theme,” which became associated with the Olympics after it was used by ABC during its coverage of the 1976 Olympics in Montreal when Nadia Comaneci of Romania won perfect scores in gymnastics. “If you’re not a sports fan, you might know this as the theme to the soap opera ‘The Young and the Restless,’ ” Gall said.
– The band’s brass section will be featured on “Bugler’s Dream” by Leo Arnaud. The tune became famous in 1968 when ABC used it for its coverage of the Olympics.

The concert even features a seventh-inning stretch, with master of ceremonies Greg Berg singing “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.” The audience, Gall added, is expected to sing along on that tune. 

Another baseball-related piece is “The National Game” march by John Philip Sousa. The 1925 song was written to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National League. Sousa was a huge baseball fan, and his Sousa Band fielded a team.

The nation’s real national game — football — is represented by several pieces, including:
– “NFL Films: Music of the Gridiron.”
– The “NFL On Fox Theme.”
– Henry Filmmore’s “Orange Bowl” march.
– And Eric Karll’s “Go! You Packers Go!” the official Green Bay Packers fight song.

Kornman is conducting two pieces from sports movies:
– “Fanfare for Rocky” by Bill Conti. “This is the version that was used in the 1976 movie and not the rock ’n’ roll version most people know,” Kornman said.
– Another selection — music from the Oscar-winning film “Chariots of Fire” — also has an Olympics connection. The 1981 British drama tells the story of two athletes competing in the 1924 Paris Olympics.

Kornman is also leading the band on “I’m Shipping Up to Boston” as performed by the Dropkick Murphys. “This is a song played in stadiums to get the crowd pumped up,” Kornman said.

Heading in a different direction, Kornman is also conducting “The Skaters’ Waltz” by Emile Waldteufel. “He was the Parisian waltz king,” Kornman said, “and was inspired to write the 1882 piece after seeing a skaters’ rink in Paris.”

Proving that they can stretch a theme, Gall and Kornman are conducting two songs that don’t immediately seem connected to sports:
– Kenneth J. Alford’s 1914 “Colonel Bogey” march — famously heard in “The Bridge on the River Kwai” movie fits the theme because a bogey is a golf term meaning “one over par.” And, Kornman says of his own golf game, “a bogey for me is good.” (Supposedly, the tune was inspired by a military man and golfer who whistled instead of shouting “Fore!”)
– The band is also playing the “Kammerfensterl Polka” because, as Gall notes, “Two to three hours of polka dancing is good aerobic exercise.”  Also, Milwaukee’s German Fest starts Friday, and Gall is performing there as part of the Dorf Kappelle band. (1 to 6 p.m. Saturday).

If you go
What: The Kenosha Pops Concert Band’s “The Sporting Life” concert
When: 7 p.m. July 27; the Dave Braun Trio performs at 6:15 p.m.
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, Seventh Avenue and 35th Street
Admission: Free 

Dave Braun Trio playing before the Pops:
The Dave Braun Trio — featuring Dave Braun on guitar, his wife Paula on bass and their son Pete on drums — is performing at 6:15 p.m. July 27 on the band shell, before the Kenosha Pops Band’s program. Paula Braun also plays flute with the Pops Band. Tim Bell — a retired jazz instructor at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside who plays clarinet in the Pops Band — will join the trio for “Won’t You Come Home Bill Bailey.” The jazz trio is also performing “All the Things You Are,” “Rio,” “Love For Sale,” “Darn That Dream” and “Get Out of Town.” The Dave Braun Trio plays at the HobNob, 277 Sheridan Road, from 7 to 10 p.m. every Friday night.  You can also hear them 8:20 Saturday night at Taste of Wisconsin on Kenosha’s lakefront and Aug. 4 at Twilight Jazz at the Anderson Arts Center. For more information, go to www.davebraunjazz.com.

Oriental Excursions

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BY LIZ SNYDER
The Kenosha Pops Concert Band is traveling to the Far East for its July 20 program — but only in a musical sense.
The 7 p.m. concert on the Sesquicentennial Band Shell features songs from Asian countries. “This will be a unique listening experience for our audience members,” said Craig Gall, the band’s conductor. “We will hopefully bring an appreciation for a style of music that is often neglected here in the U.S.” 

The program, which includes everything from Broadway musicals to a tune written by the former King of Cambodia, should “help people broaden their musical horizons,” said Garrett Kornman, the band’s assistant conductor.

The Broadway songs include works by Rodgers and Hammerstein  — “The March of the Siamese Children” from the 1951 hit musical “The King and I” and a medley of songs from 1958’s “Flower Drum Song,” including the show’s biggest hit, “I Enjoy Being a Girl.”

Also from Broadway are highlights from “Miss Saigon,” including “The Last Night of the World,” “The American Dream” and “I Still Believe.” That medley features John Sorensen on trumpet and Pat O’Dell on alto saxophone.

The tune written by His Royal Highness Prince Norodom, the former king of Cambodia, is called “Sakrava” and features a clarinet solo played by Chip Mulholland and a baritone solo played by Katie Poole. “This is a very haunting melody; it’s very delicate,” Gall said.

One of the songs has to do with a classic game — “Pachinko” by Paul Yoder. “The percussion heard in this piece emulates the sounds of the Japanese pinball machines,” Kornman said.

Japanese folks songs are represented, too, with the band playing “Japanese Fantasy” by Frank Erickson and “Japanese Rhapsody” by Clare Grundman. Both pieces are based on traditional Japanese songs.

Three of the tunes are new to the Pops Band’s library this summer:
– “Japanese,” a recently discovered piece by George Gershwin. The piece was likely written in 1918 and was later reworked by Gershwin for one of his Broadway scores.
– “Yagi-Bushi,” a Japanese folk song arranged by Naohiro Iwai. Gall heard it on a recording years ago, “and I have been looking for years for this piece,” he said. “Yagi-Bushi” features Dave Kapralian on the trumpet.
– “Dragon Boat Festival” by Michael Boo. The piece — a percussion showcase — celebrates dragon boat races in China.

Also on the program:
– “Akebono,” a Japanese naval craft march.
– “Dawn Breaks at a Shinto Shrine,” which contains those rare words in music — “bass drum cadenza.”
“This piece really paints a picture of the peaceful shrine at dawn,” Gall said. “It’s a fascinating tone poem and the most peculiar piece on the program.”
– “China Doll” by Pops favorite Leroy Anderson.
– “Double Happiness” by Joseph Curiale.

KUSD Summer Strings performing
At 6:15 p.m. on July 20, students in the Kenosha Unified School District’s Summer Strings program will perform on the band shell before the Kenosha Pops Concert Band. Selections on the program include: Hopak, Fiddle Fever, The Best of Queen, and Armed Forced Medley 

If you go
What: Kenosha Pops Concert Band concert
When: 7 p.m. July 20
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, at Seventh Avenue and 35th Street
Cost: Free

Lights, Camera, Pops!

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byLiz Snyder 

Audience members will want to grab some of that world-famous Kenosha Pops Band popcorn from the concession stand on July 13 for the band’s movie-themed “Lights! Camera! Pops!” concert at the band shell in Pennoyer Park. Craig Gall, the band’s conductor, says the program’s coming attractions include two pieces that are new to the band’s music library this summer:
–  “The Great Race” contains songs from the 1965 Blake Edwards comedy, starring Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, Natalie Wood and Peter Falk.
– “Bond … James Bond” features four of 007’s most famous theme songs — “Goldfinger,” “Nobody Does it Better,” “Skyfall” and “Live and Let Die.”

Superheroes are represented by the “Captain America March” and the ballad “Can You Read my Mind” from the 1978 movie “Superman.”

Familiar movie music on the program also includes the iconic Elmer Bernstein score from the 1960 Western “The Magnificent Seven,” the Oscar-winning “Over the Rainbow” from 1939’s “The Wizard of Oz” and the title song “The Way We Were” from the 1973 movie starring Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford.

And while there’s no truth to the rumor that you should show up for the concert wearing a toga, the program does feature music from some of Hollywood’s biggest “sword and sandal” desert epics, including:
– “Parade of the Charioteers” from the 1959 film “Ben-Hur.” The powerful score, by Miklós Rózsa, is the longest ever composed for a motion picture.
– The theme from the 1962 movie “Lawrence of Arabia.” The Oscar-winning score was composed by Maurice Jarre, who was given just six weeks to create two hours of orchestral music. Gall describes this driving piece as “a percussionist’s paradise.”

– Composer John Williams’ marches from various “Star Wars” films, which moved classic Hollywood action to space. Tunes heard in the piece include the main theme from the first movie; “Parade of the Ewoks” from “Return of the Jedi”; “The Imperial March” from “The Empire Strikes Back”; and “Augie’s Great Municipal Band” from “The Phantom Menace.”
The Pops Band is “saluting classic movies,” Gall said, “with some powerful music.”

Also on the program:
– The “Midway March” from the 1976 film. That movie’s score is also by Williams.
– “Aces High March” from the 1969 film “Battle of Britain.”
– A medley of “Unforgettable” and “Smile” — a song written by movie great Charlie Chaplin. Kenosha native Will Schaefer, who had a long career composing music for movies and television, arranged the piece.
– A song from John Huston’s 1952 film “Moulin Rouge,” with vocals by master of ceremonies Greg Berg.
And the band will set the stage for all this movie madness by performing the “Marcus Theaters Theme,” arranged by Marty Robinson, a UW-Oshkosh professor of trumpet and jazz studies.

If you go
What: Kenosha Pops Band performance
When: 7 p.m. July 13; the K-L Band performs at 6:15 p.m.
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, 35th Street and Seventh Avenue
Admission: Free 

K-L Band performing before the Pops 

The Kenosha Unified School District’s K-L Band — made up of 134 students who will be in sixth grade this fall — is performing at 6:15 p.m., before the Pops Band’s program On July 13, on the band shell in Pennoyer Park. “These students just finished their first year of playing,” said Geoff Poole, the band’s conductor. “It’s been an absolute blast to work with these kids,” he said. “They are so enthusiastic, and it’s wonderful to watch them grow as players.” Poole, an elementary school band teacher for KUSD, adds that “the K-L parents have been a great help this summer, too.”

The band ends its season tonight, performing the “Midnight Suite” by Brian Balmages. That piece has three parts — “Midnight Mission,” “Midnight Sky” and “Midnight Madness.” K-L is also performing “Bugler’s Dream” (better known as the familiar Olympic fanfare) and “Triple Threat.”

Patriotic Re-View

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by Liz Snyder
After performing in Wolfenbuttel Park July 4 before the fireworks, the Kenosha Pops Concert Band is back home July 6 on the Pennoyer Park band shell. The program is called “A Patriotic Re-View” and will feature many of the traditional patriotic songs heard on July 4. “If you’re not a fan of the Fourth of July crowds and parking problems, you can join us tonight at the band shell for a no-stress, hassle-free concert,” says Craig Gall, the band’s conductor. 

Gall will also “sprinkle in a few of the rock ’n’ roll arrangements from the concert two weeks ago that had to be canceled due to heavy rains.” (Gall admits using the term “sprinkle” might not be wise with another forecast that calls for possible showers, but he’s willing to take that chance.)

Still, you might be looking for a reason to attend tonight’s concert — especially if you’re still recovering from a weekend packed with holiday events. How about 10 reasons? With apologies to David Letterman, we offer the Top 10 Reasons You Should Attend the Pops Band’s Patriotic Re-View:

10. You’ll get to hear our national march one more time. That’s John Philip Sousa’s “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” named the official national march of the United States of America in 1987.

9. Greg Berg sings! During the program, Berg, the band’s master of ceremonies, will sing “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” and “You Raise Me Up,” a piece made famous by Josh Groban.

8. By the end of the program, you can amaze your friends and family by naming the official march of the U.S. Coast Guard (“Semper Paratus”). Listen for the official marches of the other U.S. armed services, too — “U.S. Field Artillery March” (Army), “Anchor’s Aweigh” (Navy), “U.S. Marines on Parade” (Marine Corps) and “Army Air Corps March” (Air Force).

7. You’ll relive the early days of Sonny and Cher. The “Sounds of Sonny and Cher,” a Bill Holcombe arrangement, contains early hits by the duo — “Gypsys, Tramps and Thieves,” “A Cowboy’s Work is Never Done” and “Living in a House Divided.”

6. You’ll enjoy two pieces that show off the Pops Band’s brass section. The trumpets and other brass instruments are featured on “Pop and Rock Legends: Chicago,” an arrangement by John Wasson of tunes made famous by the band Chicago, including  “Make Me Smile,” “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” “Saturday in the Park” and “25 or 6 to 4.” Brass musicans also shine on the Earth, Wind and Fire hit “September.”

5. You’ll hear Diana Ross’ first solo hit and favorites by Carole King. Assistant Conductor Garrett Kornman is conducting “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” made famous by Ross, and a medley of hits from King’s album “Tapestry,” including “You’ve Got a Friend,” “So Far Away,” “I Feel the Earth Move” and “Tapestry.”

4. You’ll brush up on American musical history, thanks to two pieces arranged by Pops favorite Clare Grundman. “The Spirit of ’76” features songs from the Revolutionary War era, including “Washington’s March at Trenton,” “Yankee Doodle,” “Norah, Dear Norah” and “Chester.” Grundman also arranged traditional pieces in his “American Folk Rhapsody No. 3.”

3. You’ll mark the 153rd anniversary of a pivotal Civil War battle. The battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania was fought July 1-3, 1863. Kornman is directing the band on “Gettsyburg,” music from the 1993 movie about the epic battle.

2. Sick of marches? How about a hymn? “God of Our Fathers” is “a fine arrangement by Thomas Knox of what is known as our national hymn,” Gall said.

1. Three words: Pops Band popcorn! The band runs a concession stand during Pennoyer Park performances, selling soda, popcorn and candy.

And a bonus reason to head to Pennoyer Park: You could win a fabulous prize. The band asks a trivia question each week, with prizes including gift certificates to local restaurants.

If you go
What: Kenosha Pops Band performance
When: 7 p.m. July 6
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, 35th Street and Seventh Avenue
Admission: Free

National Pops

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by Liz Snyder
The Kenosha Pops Concert Band is performing its traditional pre-fireworks concert July 4 in Wolfenbuttel Park.
The theme is, naturally, patriotic tunes. “This concert is a real slice of Americana — with marches, American folk melodies and songs reaching all the way back to the Revolutionary War,” says Craig Gall, the band’s conductor. “We’re covering music from the American Revolution, the Civil War and the 20th century.”
Though the program is filled with traditional favorites, audiences will also hear a piece that is new to the Pops Band this summer: “Our Own Red, White and Blue” by Henry Filmore. 

In the spirit of the July Fourth holiday, we offer a patriotic quiz, with the answers provided by the pieces on the program:
1) Which patriotic song was originally sung by British military officers to mock the disheveled, disorganized colonial “Yankees”?
“Yankee Doodle.” Audience members will hear the familiar tune as part of Clare Grundman’s “The Spirit of ’76,” which features songs from the Revolutionary War era, including “Washington’s March at Trenton,” “Yankee Doodle,” “Norah, Dear Norah” and “Chester.”

2) What are the official marches of the armed services?
“U.S. Field Artillery March” (Army), “Anchor’s Aweigh” (Navy), “U.S. Marines on Parade” (Marine Corps), “Army Air Corps March” (Air Force) and “Semper Paratus” (Coast Guard). Those marches are part of the band’s annual “Salute to the Services Medley,” finishing the concert with an echo “Taps,” the national anthem and “Stars and Stripes Forever.”

3) What piece of music is considered our national hymn?
“God of Our Fathers,” which Gall calls “a fine arrangement by Thomas Knox,” a former staff arranger for the U.S. Marine Band in Washington, D.C., popularly known as “the President’s Own” band.

4) Which John Philip Sousa tune is the national march of the United States?
By a 1987 act of the U.S. Congress, “The Stars and Stripes Forever” is the official national march of the United States of America. And it wouldn’t be the Fourth of July without hearing this tune!

5) Which Sousa march was used as theme song for the British TV comedy series “Monty Python’s Flying Circus”?
“The Liberty Bell.” Also, the U.S. Marine Corps Band has played “The Liberty Bell” march at four of the last six presidential inaugurations, in 1993, 2005, 2009 and 2013.

6) Which Sousa march was supposedly named for “the explosive sounds of the drum and bugle?
“The Thunderer.” One of Sousa’s most popular marches, the 1889 tune was used on ABC News as election music from 1968 to 1972.

7) Which Sousa march was derived from an 1896 operetta?
“El Capitan.” The piece was Sousa’s most successful stage work.

8.) What Irving Berlin tune became the signature song of singer Kate Smith?
“God Bless America.”  Also, over the decades, the 1938 song has earned millions for the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, to whom Berlin assigned all royalties.

9) What Civil War battle was fought July 1 to 3, 1863?
The battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania. Garrett Kornman, the band’s assistant conductor, is directing the band on “Gettsyburg,” from the 1993 movie about the epic battle.

10) When asked to list the three top “street marches” ever written, Sousa listed two of his own compositions, plus a third one he didn’t write. Name that march.
“National Emblem.” The march was written in 1902 by Edwin Eugene Bagley.

The Pops is also performing “Within These Hallowed Halls,” a setting of “Amazing Grace” and “Battle Hymn of the Republic” by James Swearingen. The band’s master of ceremonies, Greg Berg, will read the song’s narration, which includes quotes from U.S. presidents Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy.

If you go
What: Kenosha Pops Band’s July 4 performance
When: 7 p.m. July 4
Where: Wolfenbuttel Park on Kenosha’s lakefront, 5801 Third Ave.
Admission: Free. Benches are provided; people can also bring lawn chairs and blankets. The fireworks will start about 9:30 p.m., after the concert, and are visible all along the lakefront. 

Continental Band performing with the Pops
Before the Pops Band’s 7 p.m. July 4 concert, the Continental Recreation Band will perform, starting at 6:15 p.m. The Kenosha Unified School District summer band, made up of about 90 students who will be in seventh grade in the fall, is directed by Brittany Sebetic, a bass clarinet player with the Pops Band. She is an elementary band teacher at three KUSD schools.
The Continental Band will perform a separate program, featuring “Over the Rainow” from “The Wizard of Oz,” “Drummer’s Delight” and “Learn to Fly” by the Foo Fighters. The band will then join the Pops Band on “America in Concert,” an arrangement of “My Country ’Tis of Thee” by John Edmondson. The Continental Band has one more performance this summer: 6 p.m. July 12 at Kemper Center, as part of the Band Boosters’ Ice Cream Social event.

Pops Out West!

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By Liz Snyder
The Kenosha Pops Concert Band performs as far east as you can get in Kenosha County — right on the shore of Lake Michigan — but the program’s theme on June 29 heads in a decidedly western direction.
“Pops Out West” features songs with a Western theme, says Craig Gall, the band’s musical director.
“It gives us a chance to play a varied program of music,” he said.
Assistant Conductor Garrett Kornman added that the program “allows us to bring out a lot of pieces that wouldn’t get played otherwise — they don’t fit into other themes.”
And, Gall said, “it’s a chance for audience members to wear their cowboy hats.”
Those cowboy hats will fit right in with the “Western One-Step” movement of Robert Russell Bennett’s “Suite of Old American Dances.” Bennett, Gall said, “is known for orchestrating 300-plus Broadway musicals, but this is one of his original works for concert band.”
Gall is also leading the band on music from the Broadway musical “Paint Your Wagon.” This piece is new to the Pops Band this year, though it’s from 1951.
The Lerner and Loewe musical — adapted into a 1969 film starring Clint Eastwood in his only musical role to date — contains the songs “Wand’rin Star,” “I Still See Elisa,” “I Talk to the Trees” and “They Call the Wind Maria.”
Other songs Gall is conducting include:
– John Philip Sousa’s arrangement of a Percy Grainger setting of “Country Gardens,” a traditional dance tune.
– “The Roosters Lay Eggs in Kansas,” a piece by composer Mayhew Lake that was Sousa’s favorite encore when his band performed.
– The finale of Rossini’s “William Tell Overture.” Greg Berg, the band’s master of ceremonies, will read the radio introduction that was used by “The Lone Ranger” program that made this overture famous, Gall said.
– “Grand Canyon Fanfare,” another new piece to the Pops Band’s library. The song is from the 1991 movie “Grand Canyon.”
– Ferde Grofe’s “On the Trail” from “The Grand Canyon Suite,” an orchestral work from the 1930s. Fans of the movie “A Christmas Story” will recognize this tune as Ralphie’s BB gun theme.
– Rounding out Gall’s pieces are John Barry’s score from the 1990 Western “Dances with Wolves,” Sousa’s “New Mexico March”  and Leroy Anderson’s “Horse and Buggy.”
Kornman is leading the band on:
– “Prairie Reflections,” a medley of three classic cowboy tunes — “Along the Navajo Trail,” “Nobody’s Darlin’ But Mine” and “Just Because.”
– “Streets of Laredo,” which Kornman calls “one of the most famous cowboy songs.”
– “Hoe-Down Stomp,” a 1962 Warren Barker tune. “The piece has a hoe-down feel in the beginning, but then Barker modernizes it with a bluesy rhythm” Kornman says of the piece, which features John Sorensen on trumpet.
– “The Cowboys” by James D. Ployhar, which compiles familiar melodies — “Bury Me Not on the Lone Prairie,” “Home on the Range” and “Streets of Laredo” done in a Latin-style.
Admission is free. If it rains, the concert is canceled.
If you go
What: Kenosha Pops Concert Band performance
When: 7 tonight
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, at Seventh Avenue and 35th Street
Cost: Free
Looking ahead: The Pops Band performs a pre-fireworks show 7 p.m. Monday in Wolfenbuttel Park and, on July 6, the band is back on the band shell. That program will feature patriotic favorites plus some pieces from the June 22 rock ’n’ roll program that was rained out.
Triad jazz trio performing before the Pops tonight.
Triad, a Kenosha-based jazz trio made up of local performers/educators Brian Ford (drums), Terry Peterson (guitar) and Jeremy Kriedeman (bass), will perform from 6:15 to 6:45 tonight before the Kenosha Pops Band’s concert.
The group “is known for blending traditional jazz standards and more modern music and has built a reputation of providing audience-friendly shows that appeal to the casual music listener as well as more discriminating music aficionados,” Kriedeman said.

Pops Rocks!

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by Liz Snyder
The Kenosha Pops Concert Band is planning to make some noise June 22, 2016 for “Pops Rocks,” a program featuring “rock ’n’ roll favorites performed Kenosha Pops-style,” says Craig Gall, the band’s musical director.
One noise they hope to avoid is thunder. Severe storms are in the forecast, and Gall may be pushing his luck by conducting “Rainy Days and Mondays,” a tune made famous by The Carpenters.
If the rain holds off, he says, “Rock night should be a fun concert for everyone.”
Other songs Gall is conducting include:
– “Pop and Rock Legends: Chicago,” an arrangement by John Wasson of tunes made famous by the band Chicago, including  “Make Me Smile,” “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” “Saturday in the Park” and “25 or 6 to 4” The group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April.
– “Bacharach and David,” arranged by John Cacavas. This medley features hits written by the songwriters, including “I Say a Little Prayer,” “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again,” “What the World Needs Now is Love” and “Do You Know the Way to San Jose.” The tunes were recorded in the late 1960s by singer Dionne Warwick.
– “Tribute to Jim Croce,” including the songs  “Photographs and Memories,” “Time in a Bottle,” “Operator” and “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown.”  Croce, who died at age 30 in a 1973 plane crash, “wrote a lot of nice melodies,” Gall said.
– “Goin’ Out of My Head” by Teddy Randazzo and Bobby Weinstein, recorded by Little Anthony and the Imperials
– “Sounds of Sonny and Cher,” a Bill Holcombe arrangement containing early hits by the duo — “Gypsys, Tramps and Thieves,” “A Cowboy’s Work is Never Done” and “Living in a House Divided.”
– Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline.” “Audience participation is expected on that piece,” Gall said.
– The Earth, Wind and Fire hit “September.”
– “Volare” by Domenico Modugno. “This piece fits into our rock ’n’ roll night,” Gall explained, “because the singer was an Italian rock star who recorded this song in 1958.” “Volare” was an international hit and received two Grammy Awards.
– “Alla Barocco” by Caesar Giovannini. Gall calls this song “a blast from the past” and says “it should be recognizable to anyone who was in a high school band in the 1970s. This folk rock piece really caught on and was played by bands everywhere.”
Assistant Conductor Garrett Kornman is conducting a medley of hits from Carole King’s album “Tapestry,” including “You’ve Got a Friend,” “So Far Away,” “I Feel the Earth Move” and “Tapestry.”
Kornman is also leading the band on “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” — which was Diana Ross’ first No. 1 hit — and Richard Saucedo’s arrangment called “One Hit Wonders.” The medley includes “Hang On Sloopy,” “Whip It,” “Rock & Roll Part II (The Hey Song)” and “Mickey.”
A new piece to the Pops that Kornman is conducting “will be familiar to anyone who has heard the Samuel Adams beer commercials.” The song — “I’m Shipping Up to Boston” — also has some Hollywood fame. “This arrangement, performed by the Dropkick Murphys,” Kornman said, “was heard in the movie ‘The Departed.’ ”
Admission is free. If the weather is bad, the concert will be canceled.
If you go:
What: Kenosha Pops Concert Band performance
When: 7 p.m. June 22, 2016
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, at Seventh Avenue and 35th Street
Cost: Free

Curtain Up! on 94th Pops Season

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The Kenosha Pops Concert Band is opening its 94th season June 15, 2016, with “Curtain Up!” — a program filled with Broadway tunes. “We’re raising the curtain on another season,” said Craig Gall, the band’s conductor, “which makes a Broadway theme perfect for tonight.”
Pieces Gall will lead the band on include:
– The “Curtain Up!” medley of Broadway tunes arranged by Warren Barker, including “Let Me Entertain You” from “Gypsy,” three tunes by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe — “I Could Have Danced All Night” from “My Fair Lady,” “If Ever I Would Leave You” from “Camelot” and the title song from “Gigi” — plus Cole Porter’s “Can-Can.”
– Highlights from “Fiddler on the Roof.”
– “Stout Hearted Men” by Sigmund Romberg, from the 1928 operetta “The New Moon.”
– Leroy Anderson’s “Pyramid Dance” from the musical “Goldilocks.” The musical starred Kenosha native Don Ameche and a young Elaine Stritch, Gall said. “Critics hated the show, which was funny because it was written by theater critic Walter Kerr and his wife, Jean, but they loved Anderson’s music.”
– Highlights from “The King and I.” This is a new arrangement by Stephen Bulla of the familiar songs by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. “This is very faithful to the original Broadway overture orchestration that was heard from the pit in 1951,” Gall said.
– The Pops Band’s trombone section will be featured on “Seventy Six Trombones” by Meredith Willson.
– “Funny Girl” by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill, arranged for band by Robert Russell Bennett.
Assistant conductor Garrett Kornman is leading the band on:
– A medley of songs from Cole Porter’s musical “Kiss Me Kate.”
– A Warren Barker arrangement called “Marching Down Broadway.” This features a medley of “Before the Parade Passes By” from “Hello, Dolly!” “Hey Look Me Over” from 1960’s “Wildcat” — the only Broadway show that featured Lucille Ball — and “The New Ashmolean Marching Society and Students Conservatory Band” from the Broadway production of “Where’s Charley?” “That show starred Roy Bolger of ‘The Wizard of Oz’ fame.)
Tonight’s program features three guest vocalists performing with the Pops:
– Kathryn Thorson, a member of the Pops Band’s flute section, will be the featured vocalist on “What I Did For Love,” by Marvin Hamlisch from the Broadway musical “A Chorus Line.” This piece was arranged for Thorson by her nephew, Joshua Gallagher, a graduate of the Berklee College of Music. Miss America 2012 Laura Kaeppeler, a Kenosha native, performed this arrangement with the Pops Band in July of 2012.
– Bob Benson — filling in tonight for master of ceremonies Greg Berg — is singing George Gershwin’s “I Got Plenty o’ Nuttin’ ” from “Porgy and Bess.”
– Lou Rugani, host of WLIP-AM 1050’s longtime radio show “Music of the Stars,” is singing “Someone to Watch Over Me” and “But Not For Me” — both tunes by George and Ira Gershwin, arranged by Barker. “But Not For Me” is from the 1930 musical “Girl Crazy”; “Someone to Watch Over Me” is from the 1926 musical “Oh, Kay!”
– Kenosha native Will Schaefer arranged “A Wright and Forrest Collection” with tune from the Broadway musical “Kismet” by Robert Craig Wright and George Forrest. Songs in the medley include “Stranger in Paradise,” “And This is My Beloved” and “Baubles, Bangles and Beads” Schaefer directed this piece when he was the guest conductor with the Pops Band for its July 19, 2006, concert, said Kornman, who will conduct the piece tonight.
If you go
What: Kenosha Pops Concert Band performance
When: 7 tonight
Where: The band shell in Pennoyer Park, at Seventh Avenue and 35th Street
Cost: Free
Next concert: 7 p.m. June 22: “Pops Rocks,” featuring rock ’n’ roll favorites

2016 Kenosha Pops Concert Band Season Preview

Kenosha Pops Band performing 94th season
By Liz Snyder
As the Kenosha Pops Concert Band starts its 94th season, the group’s conductors have come up with another slate of “theme nights” for each outdoor concert. But the overall, unofficial theme for the summer is “New Music.”
“Each year, Garrett and I research new music, and some years we can’t find anything,” said Craig Gall, the band’s musical director, referring to the work he and Garrett Kornman, the band’s assistant conductor, do in the off-season. This year, however, “we’ve found a lot of really neat new pieces,” Gall said. Those “neat new pieces” have resulted in a theme centered around songs related to sports. “We were looking at some of the new music available for purchase,” Kornman said, “and we saw a piece with music from NFL Films. That inspired our ‘Sporting Life’ theme for the July 27 concert.”
“The Sporting Life” program will also feature John Philip Sousa’s “The National Game” march. That piece was written in 1925 but is new to the Pops Band’s extensive music library. Sousa wrote “The National Game” to celebrate the 50th anniversary of baseball’s National League and dedicated it to the first major league baseball commissioner, Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis.
In addition to “The Sporting Life” — which Gall calls “a brand-new theme” and is looking forward to — he says the Pops audiences “can look forward to lots of new pieces all summer.” 

June 15: “Curtain Up!”: A Broadway Night for the season opening
June 22: “Pops Rocks”: Rock ’n’ roll favorites performed Kenosha Pops-style
June 29: “Pops Out West!”: Tunes with a Western theme
July 4: “National Pops”: The band’s annual pre-fireworks concert at Wolfenbuttel Park, packed with patriotic favorites
July 6: “Patriotic Re-View”: If you missed the July 4 show — or want to hear more Sousa marches — come to Pennoyer Park
July 13: “Lights, Camera, Pops!”: The Pops Band performs music from the silver screen
July 20: “Oriental Excursions”: A program filled with tunes from the Far East
July 27: “The Sporting Life” — a program featuring song titles with a sports connection, plus a salute to the upcoming Summer Olympics
Aug. 3: “The Second Time Around”: Favorites from this season
“Pops-a-Float” — The Pops Band also performs on July 3 as part of the Kenosha Civic Veterans Parade.
Admission is free. Benches are provided at the band shell. Audience members can also bring lawn chairs or blankets.
During band shell performances, the Pops Band operates a concession stand, offering the world-famous Pops Band Popcorn, plus candy, soda, water and coffee. Funds are used to purchase equipment for the band.
Concession stand
The band operates a concession stand, offering the world-famous Pops Band Popcorn, plus candy, soda, water and coffee. Funds are used to purchase equipment for the band.
2016 Kenosha Pops Concert Band concerts
All concerts start at 7 p.m. The band’s Wednesday night concerts are on the band shell in Pennoyer Park, Seventh Avenue and 35th Street: